Tag Archives: chords

Simon & Garfunkel – I Am A Rock Chords

Download here: Simon & Garfunkel – I Am A Rock

I Am A Rock is a great tune for practicing your B minors (it’s a bar chord both on guitar and on ukulele). It’s a little tricky, as you only have two beats each on Am and Bm, so it’s worth drilling that chord change until it’s comfortable.

Recorded in 1965, the song was featured on Simon & Garfunkel’s legendary Sound of Silence album, and before that on Paul Simon’s solo album The Paul Simon Songbook. As usual from Paul Simon, it features some wonderful songwriting.

Suggested strumming pattern:
DUDUDUDU

The trick to the strum is to keep your strumming hand moving steadily up and down, without pausing. Once you’ve got the hang of that, you can focus on feel – listen to the recording for emphasised strums and variations to the pattern.

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Otis Redding – (Sitting On) The Dock Of The Bay Chords

Download here: Otis Redding – Sitting On The Dock of the Bay Chords

Another classic, this time from Otis Redding. Recorded in 1967, just days before his tragic death.

It’s a great tune for beginner guitarists to work on open chords, particularly the open B7 chord shape (and bring in the oft neglected little finger!). Alternatively, for those new to bar chords, it also makes for a perfect chord progression to practise your 6th-string (“E shaped”) bar chords up and down the neck.

Strumming

Suggested strumming pattern for beginners:
D DU UDU

More advanced players can try a hit (X) or ‘chunk’ strum on beats 2 and 4:
D XU UXU

Bonus tip for ukulele players: If you are struggling with the E chord, try an E7! It often works instead of an E (but use your ears, it doesn’t always!)

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The Police – Every Breath You Take Chords

Download here: The Police – Every Breath You Take Chords

Sting’s haunting lyrics and Andy Summers brilliant guitar riffs make for an all-time classic. Released in 1983, it has so far stood the test of time!

This version of the song uses standard open chords and a capo, so that beginners have a chance to play it (although the Eb in the second bridge may be awkward for some!) I plan to tab out the brilliant Andy Summers guitar riffs in the future, which use far more tricky up-the-neck chord stretches.

A suggested strum pattern is:

b b D b b b D b

(With the small b’s representing bass strums and the larger Ds representing full accented strums)

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